Sabal Chase Animal Clinic

Sabal Chase Animal Clinic
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Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Shaving Pets For The Summer





As we continue to slog through the dog days of summer, many pet owners have their pets shaved as a means of keeping them cool. It stands to reason that since humans require fewer layers of clothing, pets would be happier with less fur. Yet many pet parents are surprised to
learn that veterinarians do not generally recommend that summer shave.  


While it seems counterintuitive, your pet’s coat not only keeps him warm during the winter, but also cool during the summer. His coat is part of the body’s entire process of thermolregulation, and removing large quantities of hair interferes with said process. Additionally, shaving exposes the skin to allergens. Normally these might cling to the hair without causing discomfort for your pet. Without the protection of his coat, however, your pet may begin suffering from allergic dermatitis. Excess sun exposure can become a problem as well. A pet’s bare skin can burn quickly and severely in the absence of the protection that’s usually afforded by his fur. If your pet has an especially thick coat, ask your veterinarian what is best for your individual pet. Even if you get a green light for a shave, be sure to leave at least an inch of hair to keep sunburn and allergies at bay.


Hairballs Happen



Hairballs Happen
By Dr. Ian Kupkee

Mankind has been fascinated for thousands of years by the regal and dignified nature of domestic cats. Yet in spite of their mystique, many of our feline friends are plagued by the rather inelegant problem of hairballs. Hairballs happen when cats ingest too much hair during the self-grooming process. Allergies, skin diseases, stress, and external parasites are just a few reasons why cats may shed enough hair to present a problem. If your cat is losing weight, refusing food, or vomiting hair more than once a week, it’s time to see your veterinarian for a checkup.

Most of the time, however, hairballs can be controlled by making a few simple changes at home.  Daily brushing can greatly reduce the amount of hair your cat ingests. Adding omega-3 fatty acids to their diets can mitigate shedding, but supplements must be specifically labelled for use in cats. Products intended for humans often contain artificial sweeteners that are toxic to pets. Additionally, your kitty may respond to a diet that is higher in fiber, or one containing fewer potential allergens. Ask your veterinary healthcare team to recommend a suitable diet for your individual cat. Since hairballs can occasionally lead to life-threatening blockages which require a surgical fix, it’s best to intervene sooner rather than later.  Minor adjustments at the first sign of trouble are often the key to preventing a hairball horror.

Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Meet Gato, Our August Pet of the Month




World, meet Gato, our August Pet of the Month!

Like so many of South Florida's fabulous felines, Gato was a rescue with an uncertain future. For a long time, chronic skin problems and a malformed front paw stood between this sweet boy and a loving forever home. But that changed when his awesome cat daddy looked past his exceptionalities and saw a grateful heart and a new best friend.

These days, Gato spends his time watching the world go by from the comfort of a sunny window sill. And when that gets boring, he hangs out in the wall-mounted kitty condo his dad made especially for him!

Congratulations, Gato, and share with all your friends - not only did you hit the adoption jackpot, you're our Pet of the Month!

Just enjoying the view...

Chillaxin' on the top floor of the kitty condo loft!